Everyday Tao: Living with Balance and Harmony by Ming-Dao Deng

By Ming-Dao Deng

A must have for all those that are looking to contain Taoist knowledge into their daily lives, this significant other to Deng Ming-Dao's well known 365 Tao indicates readers tips to stay in concord with nature, others, and their common selves. Fifteen sections tackle key concerns encountered in religious development and supply transparent, particular instructions on bringing the Taoist spirit into paintings, relationships, and all facets of way of life. Line drawings.

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Example text

Above, upper, superior, to mount, upon. The horizontal line represents the earth, and the line above logically points upward. We must be receptive to what is above -- Tao -- not the social world. Rain pours from above. Snow falls from above. The winds blows from above. The sunlight shines from above. The stars sparkle above. The moon glows above. We who must be open to Tao must also be receptive to what is above. It is to the Tao of heaven that we must remain constantly open. We cannot similarly put our trust in society.

It helped to absorb the passage of time. It helped to settle the turmoil of working. It helped to return to the silent purity that was Tao. Even today, to sit and to be still is all we need for meditation. Elaborate means have been developed, but that is because the psychology of "civilized" people has become complex. The ancients knew that meditation did not need to be complicated. That is why they didn't even bother to give it a special name. It was only sitting, as anyone does after a long day.

The horizontal line represents the earth, and the line above logically points upward. We must be receptive to what is above -- Tao -- not the social world. Rain pours from above. Snow falls from above. The winds blows from above. The sunlight shines from above. The stars sparkle above. The moon glows above. We who must be open to Tao must also be receptive to what is above. It is to the Tao of heaven that we must remain constantly open. We cannot similarly put our trust in society. Since ancient times, dynasties have risen and fallen.

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Categories: Other Eastern Religions Sacred Texts